Crispy Pork Cheek, Belly, or Turkey Thigh Salad

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Since opening nearly 20 years ago, St. John, Fergus Henderson’s famous nose-to-tail restaurant in London, has developed a justifiable reputation for using underappreciated parts of many different types of animals (rolled pig’s spleen, anyone?). Henderson also helped popularize serving unusual vegetables and vegetables in unusual forms. I remember ordering “English peas” and watching a kitchen worker reach into a crate, pile a couple of handfuls of unshelled peas onto a plate and send them to the table.

I still visit St. John on most visits to London, and on a trip last year I ordered crispy pig’s cheek with dandelions, about as representative a dish as the restaurant offers. It was sensational: crunchy, fat-drenched croutons, hard crackling, moist, salty meat and superbitter greens with a powerful, caper-laden dressing. When I got home, I emailed Fergus — with whom I’ve cooked — and wrote, basically, Tell me how to do this. His reply:

Read the rest of this article here, and get the recipe here.

Posted in Uncategorized

The 2-D Thanksgiving

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Believe it or not, there is more than one way to roast a turkey. First, you must ask yourself what you really want. I’ll offer you three options: A fast, crisp-skinned bird, moist and not overcooked, served with roasted vegetables; a leisurely braised bird, also with veggies; or the classic stand-up roast, presented beautifully in all its glory, prepared in a straightforward manner.

If you want speed and don’t mind a novel look, choose the flattened bird, which employs a method that goes by the quaint name of spatchcocking. It takes a little work at first, because it’s a little more physical than other techniques: you have to remove the backbone, flatten the breast and dislocate the thigh joints from their sockets. None of this is difficult, but it may be a bit much for some. The reward is a lovely roasted bird with a not-overcooked breast and perfectly done legs; it also cooks in about an hour — yes, you read that right: an hour. The downside, apart from the butchering, is that some might consider it weird-looking.

Read the rest of this article here, and get the recipes here (braised), here (split-roasted) and here (classic).

Posted in American, Recipes

Turkey Curry

Still have leftover turkey in the fridge? How about turkey curry?

Posted in American, Indian

Eating in Istanbul

By Tyler Cowen

(Tyler Cowen blogs – mostly about the economy and related issues – at Marginal Revolution. But he also knows more about food than any economist I know, and I thought his insights into food in Istanbul worth posting here. -mb)

My favorite sight has been the mother-daughter pair I saw on the Bosporous ferry.  They were hugging each other on the bench and had virtually the same profile features, yet the mother carried full traditional dress and the daughter wore a mini-skirt and was otherwise dressed comparably.  They loved each other dearly.

How you interpret these women is central to how you view Istanbul.  One intuition is that they are quite alike, another is that they are quite different. Continue reading

Posted in Travel