A New Way with Tomatoes

Laura-tomatoes_out_on_a_limb_2

By Laura Virginia Anderson 

It’s gotten to the point of the summer where I’m getting a little tired of my go-to recipes for the vegetables from my CSA share. Don’t get me wrong; I still love slow-cooked Greek-style green beans (one of my friends describes them as “everything a green bean was meant to be,” and I’m inclined to agree), beets baked in foil and then sautéed in garlicky olive oil with their greens, and ripe tomatoes and peaches sliced and eaten raw with a splash of sherry vinegar and a sprinkle of salt and pepper. It’s just that these dishes no longer thrill—they’ve become almost banal, a weekly occurrence.

So I’m trying to inject a little creativity into the process of cooking and eating my vegetables and fruit. This week, I received a pint of lovely little cherry tomatoes in addition to four soft, heavy slicers. The thought of eating them all in salads didn’t appeal, nor did that of broiling them with herbs or making tomato sauce. But then I noticed the bag of whole wheat flour sitting in my pantry, and one of those thoughts arose, one of those ideas that is either brilliant or idiotic, one of those recipe-notions that takes on a life of its own and demands to be made: tomato muffins.

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Posted in Produce

A Single Person’s Guide to Produce

Laura-singles_guide_to_produce

By Laura Virginia Anderson

[In which Ms. Anderson attempts to down the full allotment of her CSA share and then some. – mb]

Let’s say you’re a single person living in Brooklyn, and let’s say that a few months ago, you signed up for a full weekly CSA share containing vegetables, fruit, and eggs. Let’s also say—just for the hell of it—that you sometimes work as an assistant stylist on the set of your boss’s cooking videos, and that you often take home leftover vegetables from the set so that they don’t get thrown away.

My hypothetical question is this: Is it possible for you, single Brooklynite, to consume your CSA share, plus vegetables rescued from the set, over the course of the week without either throwing anything away or having a nervous breakdown?

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Posted in Produce

Disaster Dal

Disaster_dal

by Laura V. Anderson

Some days, dinner does not go as planned. I’ve been working some late nights lately, and I wanted to throw together a fast, easy dinner that didn’t require a trip to the grocery store. Since I already had red lentils and spices in my pantry, dal was the obvious solution. I also had a bag of red potatoes lying around, so I decided to add a few to my lentil stew for heft. 

Tired, hungry, and harried, I peeled and chopped fresh ginger and garlic, and I cubed my potatoes. I transferred these to a soup pot as I rustled around for the other ingredients I needed. My kitchen is small—the two square feet or so of counter space it offers are perennially taken up by a dish rack and an electric kettle. There wasn’t really enough room for the soup pot on the counter, but I managed to balance it pretty well on the edge—or so I thought. Five seconds later, as I reached into my cabinet for coriander seeds, I heard a bang and looked over to see cubes of potato and flecks of garlic and ginger bouncing across my studio apartment.
 
Posted in Indian

The Department of Hard-Won, Unexpected, Partial Success

Laura_mango_mousse

By Laura Virginia Anderson 

Last week, my friend Priya hosted a dinner party and made an amazing mango mousse. She improvised it using heavy cream, canned mango pulp she had bought at an Indian grocery, sugar, fruit pectin, and lime juice. The result was incredible: the texture of a stovetop pudding married to the flavor of a mango lassi. 

I couldn’t stop thinking about it, so when the weekend arrived, I decided to give it a try. I didn’t have any mango pulp or fruit pectin, but, in a blaze of overconfidence, I felt sure that I could achieve similar results using a couple of ripe mangos and a traditional mousse technique. I peeled the mangos and cut them into chunks, then I puréed them in a blender with four egg yolks, a little sugar, and some lime zest. Meanwhile, I beat the egg whites with a pinch of salt, lime juice, and a little more sugar—so far, so good. Continue reading

Posted in Indian