Ribs for One and a Revelation

By Edward Schneider

My eating habits deteriorate when Jackie is away visiting her father. I rarely dine out, and I cook only occasionally and at a very basic level, often defrosting and modernizing old leftovers rather than starting from scratch. Once in a while I make something a little more ambitious, like a ramp pizza.

So for these short periods I become more like a typical Manhattan apartment dweller: I order in. Cheese steaks (I get two, one with Whiz and one with provolone and peppers, and both with onions, eat half of each and save the rest for another day); deli (again, eat half, but this time freeze the rest for corned beef hash upon Jackie’s return); and sometimes middling pizza, though I’ve become fussier about this in recent times. (It is interesting that this regime involves far more meat – and meat of dubious provenance – than our normal diet.)    Continue reading

Posted in American

Leftover Boiled Beef Day Two: Miroton

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By Edward Schneider

OK, it’s two days later. Time for more leftover boiled brisket, this time in the form of miroton. Like ropa vieja, miroton contains onions and takes advantage of both the meat and the broth it generated when it was simmered. Other than that, they could hardly be less alike.

Ropa vieja uses shredded meat, one of whose virtues is that it’s slightly chewy. For miroton (etymology unclear, by the way), you slice the meat thin across the grain, as though you were going to make a sandwich; one of its virtues is that it is very tender. In ropa vieja there are several vegetables; none predominate. Onions are (almost) the main ingredient in miroton; one could probably make a plausible version without the meat, not that I’d want to try. While ropa vieja doesn’t need an acidic element (a dash of something sour doesn’t hurt, though), miroton requires vinegar, enough to make you cough as you add it to the onions.

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Posted in Recipes

Leftover Boiled Beef Day One: Ropa Vieja

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By Edward Schneider 

One of the best reasons to cook a big piece of meat is the leftovers, whether they be flesh or bones, and all the things you can do with them. Hence, one of the best reasons to boil a piece of beef is the subsequent ropa vieja: Cuban-inspired shredded meat with vegetables in a tomatoey sauce. And the subsequent miroton: onions in vinegary sauce layered with thinly sliced beef, topped with breadcrumbs and baked till brown and crisp.

As a kid I hated boiled beef (and boiled chicken too), but I have come round to it in a big way, thanks perhaps to exposure to bollito misto in Italy, though it could just be part of growing up, or at any rate growing older. (By the way, did anyone out there actually like boiled meat, other than corned beef, as a child? Italians needn’t answer: of course you liked boiled meat.) Continue reading

Posted in Recipes

On a Dare: Ramp Pizza

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By Edward Schneider

[Ed Schneider is a friend of mine, a contributor to the Times and the Washington Post, and among the best home cooks I’ve ever known. I love him, even if he does write about ramps. I remain unconvinced, but I'm going to try it - next spring. – mb]

I happen to agree with New York’s Newspaper of Record that Motorino’s is the best pizza in New York. I haven’t actually been to many of its competitors, but, since for Jackie and me pizza is a meal rather than a hobby, I’m happy to accept that as fact. Anyway, it is wonderful pizza.

Right at the very beginning of spring, however, they served a ramp pizza that we didn’t much like. For one thing, the chopped ramps were chewy and harsh-tasting, and for another it was a tomato-sauce-based pie, which I thought was a bad idea – I rarely like greens cooked with tomato, though I’m more open to the concept than I used to be. When I told Mark about this, he dared me (his word) to devise a ramp pizza that wasn’t a bad idea. I’m not one to rise to a dare merely to save face: I’ll do it only if I’m confident I can actually perform the stunt in question.

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Posted in Italian, Produce