HTCE Fast: Chicken with Creamy Spinach-Cashew Sauce

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Every Wednesday, I’m featuring one of my favorite recipes from How to Cook Everything FastIf you cook it, too, I want to see it—tag it on social media with #HTCEFast. And enjoy!

This is a classic Indian preparation, achieving a delicious creaminess in almost no time.

Two 10-ounce packages frozen spinach
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken thighs
Salt and pepper
1 cup cream
1 1/2 cups unsalted cashews
2 garlic cloves
1 inch fresh ginger
1 teaspoon garam masala
Several sprigs fresh cilantro for garnish

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Posted in Mark Bittman Books, Recipes

HTCE Fast: Bánh Mì

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Every Wednesday, I’m featuring one of my favorite recipes from How to Cook Everything FastIf you cook it, too, I want to see it—tag it on social media with #HTCEFast. And enjoy!

Bánh mì—a Vietnamese-style hoagie—is often a complicated affair with a number of different components. Here it’s pared down to the absolute essentials: pork and pickled vegetables. Pretty cool for 30 minutes.

1 small daikon radish or 4 small regular red radishes
1 large carrot
1 small cucumber
Salt
3 tablespoons sugar
1 inch fresh ginger
1 garlic clove
1 tablespoon peanut oil
1 pound ground pork
1/2 cup mayonnaise
2 teaspoons Sriracha, or more to taste
1 tablespoon fish sauce
1 tablespoon soy sauce
4 hard sub rolls
Several sprigs fresh cilantro

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Posted in Mark Bittman Books, Recipes

Christie’s Pig-Crate Politics

I don’t know how Chris Christie plans to become president, but then again no one could have predicted George W. Bush, or for that matter Barack Obama, so we know that stranger things have happened. In any case, I’d love to see the guy’s political prospects fall apart over pork, and not the kind you’re thinking of. Rather, I’m hoping he’ll become a primary example of how reactionary food policy will no longer play.

Last week, Christie vetoed a bill that would have banned the use of gestation crates in New Jersey. Gestation crates, as you might know, are essentially solitary confinement jail cells for pregnant pigs. The mothers spend time during their “productive” years in these, unable to turn around and barely able to move back and forth. I would call that torture, and it would seem that forbidding that practice in your state would be the right thing to do.

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A Turkey Tale

apple pie

Or more accurately, the story of an apple pie: One of my colleagues has a niece, Kylie Jo Cagle, who baked her first pie to bring to her boyfriend’s family’s house for Thanksgiving dinner. Gorgeous, no? Apparently it was also the first dessert to be devoured. So here’s to Kylie and her newfound knack for baking. (Pizza is next on her agenda.)

I love hearing when people get turned on to cooking. And I’m glad How to Cook Everything: The Basics can help make that happen. Thank you all for your readership. Hope everyone enjoyed a lovely weekend of good food and good cheer as we kick off the holiday eating season.

Photo by Kylie Jo Cagle

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HTCE Fast: Red Lentils with Toasted Cauliflower

Red Lentils with Toasted Cauliflower

Every Wednesday, I’m featuring one of my favorite recipes from How to Cook Everything FastIf you cook it, too, I want to see it—tag it on social media with #HTCEFast. And enjoy!

There is no better use for lentils than dal, the stewed, spiced lentil dishes ubiquitous in India. The idea is to cook them long enough so they begin to break apart and become creamy. And these red pulses are not only traditional for the soupy dals (which are often used like sauces), but they also soften in minutes. Toasted cauliflower adds another layer of texture. To easily expand the meal, serve with rice, bread, or steamed greens.

5 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 small onion
1 garlic clove
1 inch fresh ginger
1 tablespoon curry powder
3 cups coconut milk (two 15-ounce cans)
1 1/2 cups red lentils
1 large head cauliflower (about 2 1/2 pounds)
Salt and pepper
4 scallions

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Posted in Mark Bittman Books, Recipes

Food Power!

There are four basic ways to change the food system. I talk about three of them a lot: The first is to eat differently, focusing on good food and especially plants; the second is to bring change to your work, whether that means becoming a farmer or helping other people eat better through your role as a teacher, doctor, artist, techie, lawyer or journalist. The third is to work locally to effect change in, for example, school systems or municipal politics.

The fourth is the toughest: Change the system that governs everything, including food. This means changing dominant economic theories and practices, and indeed the nature of capitalism itself. That isn’t happening anytime soon.

But incremental changes are possible within that system. Some believe that food is a bipartisan issue, since it’s in everyone’s interests to eat better and to protect the environment from the ravages of industrial agriculture. But it’s also true that public health, income inequality, mitigating climate change and fighting racism (just a few examples) are bipartisan issues as well, and we know how slowly change comes with those, even though change is in the interest of all but a few defenders of the status quo.

Read the rest of this column here.

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A Sustainable Solution for the Corn Belt

It’s hard to imagine maintaining the current food system without Iowa. Yet that state — symbolic of both the unparalleled richness of our continent’s agricultural potential and the mess we’ve made of it — has undergone a transformation almost as profound as the land on which cities have been built. A state that was once 85 percent prairie is now 85 percent cultivated, most of that in row crops of corn and soybeans. And that isn’t sustainable, no matter how you define that divisive word.

It’s easy enough to argue that one of the most productive agricultural regions in the world could be better used than to cover it with just two crops — the two crops that contribute most to the sad state of our dietary affairs, and that are used primarily for animal food, junk food and thermodynamically questionable biofuels. Anything that further entrenches that system — propped up by generous public support — should be questioned. On the other hand, if there are ways to make that core of industrial agriculture less destructive of land and water, that is at least moving in the right direction.

Read the rest of this column here.

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HTCE Fast: Broccoli Tabbouleh with Charred Tomato and Lemon

Broccoli Tabbouleh

Every Wednesday, I’m featuring one of my favorite recipes from How to Cook Everything FastIf you cook it, too, I want to see it—tag it on social media with #HTCEFast. And enjoy!

Tabbouleh is a classic Middle Eastern salad of bulgur, tomatoes, herbs, lemon, and olive oil. If you pulse raw broccoli in the food processor, you wind up with crunchy bits that make a fine addition. Charring the tomatoes and lemon is gilding the lily, but you do it while the bulgur cooks, and it only takes a little extra work.

1 lemon
1 pint cherry tomatoes
1 cup bulgur
Salt
4 tablespoons olive oil
Pepper
1 small head broccoli (about 1 pound)
1 bunch fresh mint
1 bunch fresh parsley
1 garlic clove

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Posted in Mark Bittman Books, Recipes

Don’t Ask How to Feed the 9 Billion

At dinner with a friend the other night, I mentioned that I was giving a talk this week debunking the idea that we need to grow more food on a large scale so we can “feed the nine billion” — the anticipated global population by 2050.

She looked at me, horrified, and said, “But how are you going to produce enough food to feed the hungry?”

I suggested she try this exercise: “Put yourself in the poorest place you can think of. Imagine yourself in the Democratic Republic of Congo, for example. Now. Are you hungry? Are you going to go hungry? Are you going to have a problem finding food?”

The answer, obviously, is “no.” Because she — and almost all of you reading this — would be standing in that country with some $20 bills and a wallet filled with credit cards. And you would go buy yourself something to eat.

 Read the rest of this column here.

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HTCE Fast: Roasted Salmon with Potato Crust

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Every Wednesday, I’m featuring one of my favorite recipes from How to Cook Everything FastIf you cook it, too, I want to see it—tag it on social media with #HTCEFast. And enjoy!

 Topping salmon with a thin layer of shredded potatoes and roasting it in a hot oven is as impressive as it is delicious. It’s also a 5-ingredient dinner, and you probably already have most of the ingredients on hand.

2 or 3 medium russet or Yukon Gold potatoes (8 ounces)
4 thick salmon fillets (1 1/2 pounds)
3 tablespoons olive oil
Salt and pepper
1 bunch fresh chives

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Posted in Mark Bittman Books, Recipes