Just Released: How to Cook Everything Vegetarian App for iPhone and iPod Touch

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The How to Cook Everything Vegetarian app for iPhone and iPod Touch just went live. I must say, it’s totally great. You can buy it here, browse the full family of How to Cook Everything apps here, or keep reading for details other than “it’s totally great.” If you already have, and love the book, this app will become it’s well-traveled companion.

From the press release:

Mark Bittman’s How to Cook Everything Vegetarian is now available as an app for iPhone and iPod Touch. This seminal work contains more than 2,000 meatless recipes and variations—plus ample cooking, shopping, and ingredient information—making this app every bit as useful as its predecessors, How to Cook Everything for iPhone and iPad.

Like the incredibly popular How to Cook Everything apps, which have had more than half a million downloads, the new app on vegetarian cooking features enhanced search capabilities, shopping lists, timers for every recipe, and featured recipes (updated weekly). Similarly, too, How to Cook Everything Vegetarian can be used anywhere, anytime, online or offline. It’s the ultimate app companion to the ultimate vegetarian cookbook.

Features of the How to Cook Everything Vegetarian app include:

·       Intuitive filters that pinpoint searches by multiple ingredients,

        techniques, or styles

·       Access to how-to illustrations and detailed reference information

·       Customizable shopping lists and personalized favorites lists

·       Built-in timers and a settings option for integrated metric display

·       Cooking inspiration with Bittman’s Picks, Menu Ideas, and weekly new

        featured recipes

·       Printing and emailing option for recipes and shopping lists

 

Posted in Mark Bittman Books

My First New York Times Opinion Column

I couldn’t be more thrilled with the opportunity to write an opinion column about food. Here’s my very first, a food manifesto of sorts, which hits on a number of topics that I will return to in weeks and months (and hopefully years) to come.

Posted in Food Politics, Mark Bittman Books

Every Minimalist Column in History!

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Want to read every single Minimalist column of all-time? Of course you do. September 17, 1997 to January 26, 2011. Have at it.

Posted in Mark Bittman Books

Win a Copy of The Food Matters Cookbook

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Grub Street is giving away a copy of The Food Matters Cookbook. All you need to do is email them “what dish or favorite food matters most to you and why, in 200 words or less. Humor and originality tend to score big with…Grub Street editors, so please attempt to bust [their] sides as best as possible.” The deadline for submissions is 5pm on Monday, October 11th. Good luck!

Posted in Events, Mark Bittman Books

Food Matters Cookbook: Sneak Preview Recipe

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Recipe from The Food Matters Cookbook. Pre-order the book today or pick up a copy when it’s released on September 21st.

Roast Turnips and Duck with Pear Jus

Makes: 4 servings        

Time: About 1 hour        

Even though duck is no more difficult to prepare than chicken, it always feels much more elegant. Braise it with turnips, and it’s a classic; with the addition of a pear-brandy sauce, it becomes sweeter, more complex, and downright luxurious. Simply cooked leafy vegetables or a green salad are all you need on the side.

1 or 2 boneless duck breasts (about 1 pound), with the skin

Salt and black pepper

1 pound turnips or rutabagas, cut into large chunks

8 fresh sage leaves

1 bay leaf

2 garlic cloves, smashed

2 pears, peeled and chopped

1/2 cup vegetable or chicken stock, or water

1/4 cup brandy

Chopped fresh parsley, for garnish

1. Heat the oven to 400°F. Score the skin of the duck breasts, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and place them skin side down in a large, ovenproof skillet or Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Brown thoroughly on both sides, rotating and turning as necessary, 10 to 15 minutes total. Remove the duck from the pan and pour off all but 2 tablespoons of the fat.

2. Add the turnips, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and roast until they are nicely browned on the bottom and just getting tender, 15 to 20 minutes. Stir in the sage, bay leaf, and garlic and return the duck to the pan. Roast until the turnips are tender and the duck is cooked to your liking, about 15 minutes for medium-rare. Put the duck on a plate or cutting board to rest, and transfer the turnips to a serving platter.

3. Put the pan on a burner over medium-high heat. Add the pears, stock, and brandy and bring to a boil. Cook, stirring to loosen any browned bits from the bottom of the pan, until the pears are soft and the pan juice is slightly thickened, 5 to 10 minutes. Remove the bay leaf. Thinly slice the duck. Serve a few slices on top of a pile of the turnips and spoon the pear sauce over the top. Garnish with parsley and serve.

 

Posted in Behind The Scenes, Mark Bittman Books

Food Matters Cookbook: Sneak Preview Recipe

Lemond_almond_florentines_1

Recipe from The Food Matters Cookbook. Pre-order the book today or pick up a copy when it’s released on September 21st.

Lemon-Almond Florentines

Makes: About 3 dozen        

Time: About 40 minutes, plus time to cool         

Many Florentine recipes call for coating the cookies in melted chocolate, which I think is overkill. I really prefer the touch of lemon. Unsalted butter for greasing the pans

2 cups whole almonds

1/2 cup powdered sugar

1 egg white

1/4 teaspoon salt

Grated zest and juice of 2 lemons

1. Heat the oven to 300°F. Grease 2 baking sheets with a generous smear of butter.

2. Grind the nuts in a food processor until they are just beginning to form a paste; this takes less than a minute. Transfer the nuts to a bowl and add the sugar, egg white, salt, and lemon zest. Stir, adding some lemon juice, a few drops at a time, until the mixture drops easily from a teaspoon. Save the leftover lemon juice.

3. Use the teaspoon to put dollops of the batter about 3 inches apart on the prepared sheets. Dip a fork in the reserved lemon juice and spread the batter into thin (about 1/8 inch) circles, roughly 11/2 inches in diameter. Bake, rotating the pans once or twice, until firm, golden brown on top, and slightly darkened around the edges, 15 to 20 minutes. Let the cookies cool on the baking sheets, then transfer them to wire racks to let them become crisp. Store in a tightly covered container at room temperature for no more than a day or 2.

Orange-Hazelnut Florentines. Use hazelnuts instead of almonds, and orange zest and juice instead of lemon.

 

Posted in Baking, Mark Bittman Books