Make Mine Pecan

Text and photos by Pam Hoenig

I am a huge fan of pecans (and pecan pie), so deciding to make Pecan-Caramel Bars from How to Bake Everything was a total no-brainer.

I’ve never made layered bars before and it ended up being a snap. A buttery dough with just a bit of sugar gets pressed into the bottom of a 9-inch square pan, then baked until the edges brown and pull away from the pan, about 15 minutes. Continue reading

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When Chips Just Aren’t Enough: Chocolate Chunk Cookies

Text and photos by Kate Bittman

I made the Chocolate Chunk Cookies from How to Bake Everything yesterday in a ridiculously short amount of time. The dough took only 5 minutes to put together, then I stuck it in the fridge to tend to a (lovely) needy baby, pulled it out later that night after said child was sleeping, plunked rounded tablespoons onto baking sheets, baked for 9 minutes at 375 degrees, and was eating melty warm cookies (I did not abide by the “cool for about 3 to 5 minutes” instruction) almost immediately after I was done with dinner. Continue reading

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Healthy Holiday Baking: Banana Oatmeal Cookies

Text and photo by Emily Stephenson

For the lead up to the holidays, we’re baking Mark’s favorite cookies from How to Bake Everything and sharing the recipes here. I chose these Banana Oatmeal Cookies , even though I was skeptical about the amount of butter (low) and sugar (even lower) they contained.  Continue reading

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Chocolate Almond Holiday Cookies

Text and photos by Mark Bittman

I have always loved chocolate-almond cookies, but some are better than others. To me, the ideal has these qualities: Continue reading

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No-Knead Bread, 10 Years Later

I was sitting at my desk at the Times 10 years ago when Jim Lahey – whom I knew only by reputation – emailed me: “I have a new method of making bread that requires no kneading and can give you professional results at home.”

I started baking bread in 1970, and, when my friend Charlie Van Over developed what I still believe is the best food processor method there is, I adopted that and never looked back. But Lahey’s invitation was intriguing, and, besides, Sullivan St. Bakery was a 10 minute walk from the Times. (Not, as you might imagine, on Sullivan Street, but on 47th Street.) Why the hell not?

It was a period during which the Times was experimenting with video, and I was one of the lucky guinea pigs. So on a bright November day (Jim insists it was election day 2006; I have no recollection), I walked over with two video people, we watched Jim do his thing, I wrote it up, the video people edited, and …. It became one of the most popular stories in the history of the Times.

That level of popularity was a peculiar confluence of events, but that bread recipe (which I used yesterday, and will tomorrow, barely unchanged from the original), has legs. That original description by Jim remains true, and literally millions of people now make bread according to Jim’s instructions.

A few weeks ago, just before election day 2016, I met two video people from Food & Wine at Sullivan Street (which hasn’t changed much) and we taped a reunion, with Jim commenting on and critiquing my technique (which evidently isn’t bad). You can watch (the extremely abridged version) here. As you can tell – we had fun.

Posted in Baking

How to Bake Everything: Buttermilk Biscuits

Text and photos by Emily Stephenson

One of my favorite ways to use a big, exhaustive cookbook is to flip to the index and figure out how to make use of an ingredient I’ve already got. This week, it was about a cup of buttermilk, and I turned to How to Bake Everything.

I wanted to make something that wouldn’t require a trip to the grocery store, which made whittling down my options easy: no Buttermilk Pie or Bars because I didn’t have cream to make a custard, no cakes because I don’t own an electric mixer (no way I’m going to cream the butter and sugar by hand!), and no cookies because I had less than a stick of butter in the fridge. What did that leave? After about 2 minutes of narrowing down, only one option: Buttermilk Biscuits. Continue reading

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How to Bake Everything: A Little Chocolate Goes a Long Way

Text and photos by Emily Stephenson

This tart was so awesome it was gone by the time of writing this post, and I’m ambivalent about chocolate. I am not the type of person who loses her mind over chocolate cake, or chocolate ice cream, or unadorned chocolate. I will eat those things, of course, but they are not my first dessert choice. Enthusiasts, please stay with me.  Continue reading

Posted in Baking, Mark Bittman Books, Recipes

How to Bake Everything: Back to Bread

Text and photos by Pam Hoenig

The last time I baked bread, I was in junior high school, which is more years ago than I care to count. I started with plain white bread, baked up in a loaf pan, and then went on to experiment a bit with different recipes. My Waterloo, if my memory is correct, was a pumpernickel rye. I can’t exactly recall what went wrong, but I know for sure that something did! Continue reading

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How to Bake Everything: Apple Crisp with Real Apples and Real Talk

I’d really like to know what folks think about this video, which is the second (the first is here) in a series I did with my friend Ricardo Salvador (@cadwego), who heads the Food and Environment team at Union of Concerned Scientists, of which I’m happy to be a part. The series combines cooking—in this case an apple crisp, more on which in a second—with a discussion of the production of food and the policies that guide it (often mis-guide, of course). I hope the main points are clear. (I also discussed the election and the future of food policy with Mother Jones.) Continue reading

Posted in Baking, Food Politics, Mark Bittman Books

How to Bake Everything: Better-for-You Rice Treats

Text and photos by Kerri Conan

The first thing that hit me when I saw Mark’s recipe for No-Bake Fruit and Cereal Bars in his new book How to Bake Everything was that it sounded a lot like Rice Krispies Treats®, only with fruit and juice instead of the sticky marshmallow sauce for glue. If I went with a puffed whole grain—Khorasan wheat to be exact—the bars would have a similar texture and, with the fiber and small bit of honey for sweetener, they’d actually be a healthy and satisfying snack. Continue reading

Posted in Baking, Mark Bittman Books, Recipes, Uncategorized