Brisket Redux

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By Daniel Meyer

Before the Rosh Hashanah brisket ever made it out of the roasting pan the cook announced that it was “dry.” It sort of was, but tasty nonetheless, especially the fattiest bits. There was a whole tupperware left over (which had less to do with dryness than with abundance.)

The next night, with dry-ish brisket in the fridge and a can of beer twinkling next to it, I did the most sensible thing I could think of: put them together. I sauteed a small chopped onion with cumin, coriander, and a little cinnamon, then added the brisket along with chopped chipotles in adobo, (languishing in the fridge) and a few glugs of beer. That bubbled away until the beer disappeared, mostly into the brisket, I think, which became very moist.

Most of the brisket I stuffed into roasted squash halves (dusted with some of the same spices from above.) Those were baked a little more until the squash was very tender, then topped with some bland Mexican melting cheese and blasted in the broiler until bubbly.

The brisket that couldn’t fit into the squash got smothered with ribbons of collard greens, more beer, and some water, and slowly simmered until the greens were dark and tender, and the liquid, again, gone. 

The brisket, turned juicy and spicy, would have been better on a sandwich. The roasted squash, which I forget how much I like every summer, would have been better by itself. The brisket and collards, however, were made for each other. 

At the very least, I didn’t have to announce that anything was “dry.”

Posted in Recipes

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