3 Recipes to Change Your Life and the World

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The more we cook, the healthier we (and the planet) will be. If you already cook on a regular basis – and if you’re reading this piece chances are you do – send this article to someone who doesn’t: We’ll all be better off.

Posted in Food Politics

5 Comments

  1. veganoutreach said...

    Great post, Mark! For stir-fries, we love the vegetarian beef or chicken strips at Trader Joes.Happy New Year!

  2. Mark S said...

    Great argument and those recipes look tasty!Two suggestions to make these (and other) recipes friendlier to novice cooks:(1) Specify salt quantity: Almost all Bittman recipes don’t do this. It’s always "to taste". I know that salt tastes vary, but a suggested starting point would useful – especially for an inexperienced cook. This is doubly true for a dish like rice and lentils, where the correct salt balance is a crucial component of the dish’s good flavor. So maybe instead of just "salt", the recipe should say, "1/2 tsp salt, or to taste". This may violate the Minimalist ethic, but it would help the goal of cooking adoption.(2) Use realistic time estimates. The rice and beans recipe for example, is specified to take 45 minutes. But according to the recipe, cooking time alone is _at least_ 40 minutes. That leaves 5 of the allotted minutes to wash everything, peel onion and garlic, chop onion, carrots, celery, pork, and parsley, and mince the garlic. 45 minutes is clearly unrealistic. Some may argue that cooking time shouldn’t count in the estimate but they’re wrong: it should. Listing a too-short estimate may make the dish seem easier to cook, but when in practice it takes twice as long, the novice cook will be discouraged and dinner will be delayed. I am a huge Bittman fan and a I look forward to trying these recipes!Mark

  3. Maria Honeywell said...

    Beautiful. I have everything on hand for that lentil/rice recipe. And you even answered my question about substituting grains before I asked. You must be a mind-reader.Happy, healthy 2011.

  4. Chris Hampton said...

    Your article really resonated with me as a method of changing eating habits that’s attainable and reasonable, and I’m going to try some of these recipes out. I’m hoping you might be able to help me out with a correction to the chicken stir-fry recipe on the Times site that I find REALLY confusing. There’s a January 9 correction on the Times site that says, "Add 1 cup coconut milk — not water or stock — after stir-frying the vegetables in Step 2. (The list of ingredients did not include a reference to any liquid.)" Step 2 doesn’t mention stock at all. Does the coconut milk goes in place of the cup of water mentioned in Step 2? Or am I supposed to put it in earlier, or later? I was even further confused when I found the same recipe on the Today Show site and it doesn’t mention the coconut milk there either. If you could help clarify this (and perhaps get them to make it clearer on the Times website) I would very much appreciate it.

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