Local Food is Not Elitist. It’s American

I’m not a jingoist, but I’d prefer that more of my food came from America. It’d be even better, really, if most of it came from within a few hundred miles of where we live. We’d be more secure and better served, and our land would be better used. And I’d feel prouder, as if we had a food culture rather than a food fetish.

The Farm Bill [PDF], which is currently under negotiation for renewal — and is dangerously close to being pushed through without real debate — needs to address this issue head-on. But by subsidizing commodities, the existing bill (and food policy in general), pushes things in precisely the opposite direction. The vast majority of our farmland grows corn (we’re the world’s largest producer), soy and wheat, and these, along with meat and dairy, make us net exporters of foodstuffs.

Incredibly, however, we are net importers of fruits and vegetables, foods that our land is capable of growing in abundance and once did. Most of our imports are from Mexico, Chile and Canada, but fresh fruits and especially vegetables are shipped here from all over the world, with significant quantities coming from as far away as India, China and Thailand. And those imports are growing.

Read the rest of this column here

Posted in Farming, Food Politics

Charred, Soy-Marinated Mackerel

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By Daniel Meyer

A good treatment for mackerel: dunk a few fillets in soy sauce, mirin (optional) and a little sesame or peanut oil (some garlic and ginger would be good, too.) Let the mackerel marinate while you heat a grill or broiler, the hotter the better. (For concentrated heat, I’ve started grilling directly over a chimney starter.) Grill or broil the fillets until nicely charred on both the flesh and skin side, and just cooked through, 2 or 3 minutes per side if your heat is really cranked up. Serve over rice with scallions and sesame seeds (kimchi and and an egg yolk are a treat, but by no means necessary.)

Posted in Recipes, Seafood